Mantis Bug Tracker Developers Guide

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Table of Contents
Contributing to MantisBT
Initial Setup
Cloning the Repository
Determining the Clone URL
Initializing the Clone
Adding remotes
Checking out branches
Maintaining Tracking Branches
Preparing Feature Branches
Private Branches
Public Branches
Running PHPUnit tests
Running the SOAP tests
Submitting Changes
Via Formatted Patches
Via Public Repository
Database Schema Management
The MantisBT schema
Schema Definition
Installation / Upgrade Process
Event System
General Concepts
API Usage
Event Types
Plugin System
General Concepts
Building a Plugin
The Basics
Pages and Files
Events
Configuration
Language and Localization
Example Plugin Source Listing
Example/Example.php
Example/files/foo.css
Example/lang/strings_english.txt
Example/page/config_page.php
Example/pages/config_update.php
Example/page/foo.php
API Usage
Event Reference
Introduction
System Events
Output Modifier Events
String Display
Menu Items
Page Layout
Bug Filter Events
Custom Filters and Columns
Bug and Bugnote Events
Bug View
Bug Actions
Bugnote View
Bugnote Actions
Notification Events
Recipient Selection
User Account Events
Account Preferences
Management Events
Projects and Versions
Integrating with MantisBT
Java integration
Prebuilt SOAP stubs using Axis
Usage in OSGi environments
Compatibility between releases
Support
Appendix
Git References

Contributing to MantisBT

MantisBT uses the source control tool Git for tracking development of the project. If you are new to Git, you can find some good resources for learning and installing Git in the Appendix.


Initial Setup

There are a few steps the MantisBT team requires of contributers and developers when accepting code submissions. The user needs to configure Git to know their full name (not a screen name) and an email address they can be contacted at (not a throwaway address).

To set up your name and email address with Git, run the following commands, substituting your own real name and email address:

$ git config --global user.name "John Smith"
$ git config --global user.email "jsmith@mantisbt.org"
		

Optionally, you may want to also configure Git to use terminal colors when displaying file diffs and other information, and you may want to alias certain Git actions to shorter phrases for less typing:

$ git config --global color.diff "auto"
$ git config --global color.status "auto"
$ git config --global color.branch "auto"

$ git config --global alias.st "status"
$ git config --global alias.di "diff"
$ git config --global alias.co "checkout"
$ git config --global alias.ci "commit"
		

Cloning the Repository

The official MantisBT source code repository is hosted at GitHub. This document assumes that you have already signed up for and setup a GitHub account.


Determining the Clone URL

Which URL you will use to clone the repository before you start developing depends on your situation.

MantisBT Core Team Developers

MantisBT developers have push access to the official repository.

Benefitting from this access requires a special URL that uses your SSH key to handle access permissions: git@github.com:mantisbt/mantisbt.git. Alternatively, an HTTPS link can be used as well, in which case you will have to provide your GitHub User ID and password when Git requests it: https://github.com/mantisbt/mantisbt.git.

Note

Pushes will fail if you do not have push access or your public SSH key is not set up correctly in your GitHub profile.

Contributors

For other people, the MantisBT repository and the related clone URLs git://github.com/mantisbt/mantisbt.git (SSH) or https://github.com/mantisbt/mantisbt.git (HTTPS) will always be read-only.

It is therefore strongly advised to create your own fork of MantisBT where you will be able to push your changes, and then use the fork's URL instead to clone, which will look like this: git@github.com:YourGitHubID/mantisbt.git or https://github.com/YourGitHubID/mantisbt.git


Initializing the Clone

To clone the repository, execute the following command from your target workspace:

git clone YourCloneURL
After performing the cloning operation, you should end up with a new directory in your workspace, mantisbt/, containing the MantisBT repository with a remote named origin pointing to your Clone URL.

MantisBT uses Git submodules to store and manage some third-party libraries. These require additional steps to initialize properly:

cd mantisbt
git submodule update --init

Warning

Failure to execute the submodule initialization commands will result in the corresponding directories under /library being empty, which will then cause errors when running MantisBT.


Adding remotes

If you are planning to use your own fork to push and maintain your changes, then we recommend setting up an upstream remote for MantisBT's official repository, which will make it easier to keep your repository up-to-date.

git remote add --tags upstream git://github.com/mantisbt/mantisbt.git


Checking out branches

By default, the new clone will only track code from the primary remote branch, master, which is the latest development version of MantisBT. If you are planning to work with stable release or other development branches, you will need to set up local tracking branches in your repository.

The following command will set up a tracking branch for the current stable branch, master-1.2.x.

git checkout -b master-1.2.x origin/master-1.2.x

Note

With the introduction of submodules for some of the third-party libraries, you may encounter issues when switching to an older branch which still has code from those libraries in a subdirectory of /library rather than a submodule:

$ git checkout old_branch
error: The following untracked working tree files would be overwritten by checkout
	(list of files)
Aborting

To resolve this, you first have to get rid of the submodules directories before you can checkout the branch. The command below will move all submodules to /tmp:

sed -rn "s/^.*path\s*=\s*(.*)$/\1/p" .gitmodules |xargs -I{} mv -v {} /tmp
git checkout old_branch

When switching back from the older branch, the submodules directories will be empty. At that point you can either

  • Update the submodules to reclone them

    git submodule update

  • Restore the directories previously moved to /tmp back into the empty directories, e.g.

    sed -rn "s/^.*path\s*=\s*(.*)$/\1/p" .gitmodules |xargs -n 1 basename |xargs -I{} mv -v /tmp/{} library

For further reference: Pro Git book


Maintaining Tracking Branches

In order to keep your local repository up-to-date with the official one, there are a few simple commands needed for any tracking branches that you may have, including master and master-1.2.x.

First, you'll need to get the latest information from the remote repo:

git fetch origin

Note

If you cloned from your personal GitHub fork instead of the official MantisBT repository as explained in the Section called Adding remotes>, then you should instead execute:

git fetch upstream

Then for each tracking branch you have, enter the following commands:

git checkout BranchName
git rebase

Alternatively, you may combine the fetch and rebase operations described above into a single pull command (for each remote tracking branch):

git checkout master
git pull --rebase


Preparing Feature Branches

For each local or shared feature branch that you are working on, you will need to keep it up to date with the appropriate master branch. There are multiple methods for doing this, each better suited to a different type of feature branch. Both methods assume that you have already performed the previous step, to update your local tracking branches.


Private Branches

If the topic branch in question is a local, private branch, that you are not sharing with other developers, the simplest and easiest method to stay up to date with master is to use the rebase command. This will append all of your feature branch commits into a linear history after the last commit on the master branch.

$ git checkout feature
$ git rebase master
			

Do note that this changes the commit ID for each commit in your feature branch, which will cause trouble for anyone sharing and/or following your branch. In this case, if you have rebased a branch that other users are watching or working on, they can fix the resulting conflict by rebasing their copy of your branch onto your branch:

$ git checkout feature
$ git fetch remote/feature
$ git rebase remote/feature
			

Public Branches

For any publicly-shared branches, where other users may be watching your feature branches, or cloning them locally for development work, you'll need to take a different approach to keeping it up to date with master.

To bring public branch up to date, you'll need to merge the current master branch, which will create a special "merge commit" in the branch history, causing a logical "split" in commit history where your branch started and joining at the merge. These merge commits are generally disliked, because they can crowd commit history, and because the history is no longer linear. They will be dealt with during the submission process.

$ git checkout feature
$ git merge master
			

At this point, you can push the branch to your public repository, and anyone following the branch can then pull the changes directly into their local branch, either with another merge, or with a rebase, as necessitated by the public or private status of their own changes.


Running PHPUnit tests

MantisBT has a suite of PHPUnit tests found in the tests directory. You are encouraged to add your own tests for the patches you are submitting, but please remember that your changes must not break existing tests.

In order to run the tests, you will need to have the PHP Soap extension , PHPUnit 3.4 or newer and Phing 2.4 or newer installed. The tests are configured using a bootstrap.php file. The boostrap.php.sample file contains the settings you will need to adjust to run all the tests.

Running the unit tests is done from root directory using the following command:

$ phing test
		

Running the SOAP tests

MantisBT ships with a suite of SOAP tests which require an initial set up to be executed. The required steps are:

  • Install MantisBT locally and configure a project and a category.

  • Adjust the bootstrap.php file to point to your local installation.

  • Customize the config_inc.php to enable all the features tested using the SOAP tests. The simplest way to do that is to run all the tests once and ajust it based on the skipped tests.


Submitting Changes

When you have a set of changes to MantisBT that you would like to contribute to the project, there are two preferred methods of making those changes available for project developers to find, retrieve, test, and commit. The simplest method uses Git to generate a specially-formatted patch, and the other uses a public repository to host changes that developers can pull from.

Formatted patches are very similar to file diffs generated by other tools or source control systems, but contain far more information, including your name and email address, and for every commit in the set, the commit's timestamp, message, author, and more. This formatted patch allows anyone to import the enclosed changesets directly into Git, where all of the commit information is preserved.

Using a public repository to host your changes is marginally more complicated than submitting a formatted patch, but is more versatile. It allows you to keep your changesets up to date with the offiicial development repository, and it lets anyone stay up to date with your repository, without needing to constantly upload and download new formatted patches whenever you change anything. There is no need for a special server, as free hosting for public repositories can be found on many sites, such as MantisForge.org, GitHub, or Gitorious.


Via Formatted Patches

Assuming that you have an existing local branch that you've kept up to date with master as described in Preparing Feature Branches, generating a formatted patch set should be relatively straightforward, using an appropriate filename as the target of the patch set:

$ git format-patch --binary --stdout origin/master..HEAD > feature_branch.patch
			

Once you've generated the formatted patch file, you can easily attach it to a bug report, or even use the patch file as an email to send to the developer mailing list. Developers, or other users, can then import this patch set into their local repositories using the following command, again substituting the appropriate filename:

$ git am --signoff feature_branch.patch
			

Via Public Repository

We'll assume that you've already set up a public repository, either on a free repository hosting site, or using git-daemon on your own machine, and that you know both the public clone URL and the private push URL for your public repository.

For the purpose of this demonstration, we'll use a public clone URL of git://mantisbt.org/contrib.git, a private push URL of git@mantisbt.org:contrib.git, and a hypothetical topic branch named feature.

You'll need to start by registering your public repository as a 'remote' for your working repository, and then push your topic branch to the public repository. We'll call the remote public for this; remember to replace the URL's and branch name as appropriate:

$ git remote add public git@mantisbt.org:contrib.git
$ git push public feature
			

Next, you'll need to generate a 'pull request', which will list information about your changes and how to access them. This process will attempt to verify that you've pushed the correct data to the public repository, and will generate a summary of changes that you should paste into a bug report or into an email to the developer mailing list:

$ git request-pull origin/master git://mantisbt.org/contrib.git feature
			

Once your pull request has been posted, developers and other users can add your public repository as a remote, and track your feature branch in their own working repository using the following commands, replacing the remote name and local branch name as appropriate:

$ git remote add feature git://mantisbt.org/contrib.git
$ git checkout -b feature feature/feature
			

If a remote branch is approved for entry into master, then it should first be rebased onto the latest commits, so that Git can remove any unnecessary merge commits, and create a single linear history for the branch. Once that's completed, the branch can be fast-forwarded onto master:

$ git checkout feature
$ git rebase master
$ git checkout master
$ git merge --ff feature
			

If a feature branch contains commits by non-developers, the branch should be signed off by the developer handling the merge, as a replacement for the above process:

$ git checkout feature
$ git rebase master
$ git format-patch --binary --stdout master..HEAD > feature_branch.patch
$ git am --signoff feature_branch.patch
			

Database Schema Management

The MantisBT schema

The MantisBT database schema (excluding plugins) is described in the Entity-Relationship diagram (ERD) below. There is also a PDF version available for download.

Figure 1. MantisBT Entity-Relationship Diagram


Schema Definition

TODO: Discuss the ADODB datadict formats and the format MantisBT expects for schema deinitions.


Installation / Upgrade Process

TODO: Discuss how MantisBT handles a database installation / upgrade, including the use of the config system and schema definitions.


Event System

General Concepts

The event system in MantisBT uses the concept of signals and hooked events to drive dynamic actions. Functions, or plugin methods, can be hooked during runtime to various defined events, which can be signalled at any point to initiate execution of hooked functions.

Events are defined at runtime by name and event type (covered in the next section). Depending on the event type, signal parameters and return values from hooked functions will be handled in different ways to make certain types of common communication simplified.


API Usage

This is a general overview of the event API. For more detailed analysis, you may reference the file core/event_api.php in the codebase.

Declaring Events

When declaring events, the only information needed is the event name and event type. Events can be declared alone using the form:

event_declare( $name, $type=EVENT_TYPE_DEFAULT );

or they can be declared in groups using key/value pairs of name => type relations, stored in a single array, such as:

$events = array(
	$name_1 => $type_1,
	$name_2 => $type_2,
	...
	);

event_declare_many( $events );
			

Hooking Events

Hooking events requires knowing the name of an already-declared event, and the name of the callback function (and possibly associated plugin) that will be hooked to the event. If hooking only a function, it must be declared in the global namespace.

event_hook( $event_name, $callback, [$plugin] );

In order to hook many functions at once, using key/value pairs of name => callback relations, in a single array:

$events = array(
	$event_1 => $callback_1,
	$event_2 => $callback_2,
	...
	);

event_hook( $events, [$plugin] );
			

Signalling Events

When signalling events, the event type of the target event must be kept in mind when handling event parameters and return values. The general format for signalling an event uses the following structure:

$value = event_signal( $event_name, [ array( $param, ... ), [ array( $static_param, ... ) ] ] );

Each type of event (and individual events themselves) will use different combinations of parameters and return values, so use of the Event Reference is reccommended for determining the unique needs of each event when signalling and hooking them.


Event Types

There are five standard event types currently defined in MantisBT. Each type is a generalization of a certain "class" of solution to the problems that the event system is designed to solve. Each type allows for simplifying a different set of communication needs between event signals and hooked callback functions.

Each type of event (and individual events themselves) will use different combinations of parameters and return values, so use of the Event Reference is reccommended for determining the unique needs of each event when signalling and hooking them.

EVENT_TYPE_EXECUTE

This is the simplest event type, meant for initiating basic hook execution without needing to communicate more than a set of immutable parameters to the event, and expecting no return of data.

These events only use the first parameter array, and return values from hooked functions are ignored. Example usage:

event_signal( $event_name, [ array( $param, ... ) ] );

EVENT_TYPE_OUTPUT

This event type allows for simple output and execution from hooked events. A single set of immutable parameters are sent to each callback, and the return value is inlined as output. This event is generally used for an event with a specific purpose of adding content or markup to the page.

These events only use the first parameter array, and return values from hooked functions are immediatly sent to the output buffer via 'echo'. Example usage:

event_signal( $event_name, [ array( $param, ... ) ] );

EVENT_TYPE_CHAIN

This event type is designed to allow plugins to succesively alter the parameters given to them, such that the end result returned to the caller is a mutated version of the original parameters. This is very useful for such things as output markup parsers.

The first set of parameters to the event are sent to the first hooked callback, which is then expected to alter the parameters and return the new values, which are then sent to the next callback to modify, and this continues for all callbacks. The return value from the last callback is then returned to the event signaller.

This type allows events to optionally make use of the second parameter set, which are sent to every callback in the series, but should not be returned by each callback. This allows the signalling function to send extra, immutable information to every callback in the chain. Example usage:

$value = event_signal( $event_name, $param, [ array( $static_param, ... ) ] );

EVENT_TYPE_FIRST

The design of this event type allows for multiple hooked callbacks to 'compete' for the event signal, based on priority and execution order. The first callback that can satisfy the needs of the signal is the last callback executed for the event, and its return value is the only one sent to the event caller. This is very useful for topics like user authentication.

These events only use the first parameter array, and the first non-null return value from a hook function is returned to the caller. Subsequent callbacks are never executed. Example usage:

$value = event_signal( $event_name, [ array( $param, ... ) ] );

EVENT_TYPE_DEFAULT

This is the fallback event type, in which the return values from all hooked callbacks are stored in a special array structure. This allows the event caller to gather data separately from all events.

These events only use the first parameter array, and return values from hooked functions are returned in a multi-dimensional array keyed by plugin name and hooked function name. Example usage:

$values = event_signal( $event_name, [ array( $param, ... ) ] );

Plugin System

General Concepts

The plugin system for MantisBT is designed as a lightweight extension to the standard MantisBT API, allowing for simple and flexible addition of new features and customization of core operations. It takes advantage ofthe new Event System to offer developers rapid creation and testing of extensions, without the need to modify core files.

Plugins are defined as implementations, or subclasses, of the MantisPlugin class as defined in core/classes/MantisPlugin.php. Each plugin may define information about itself, as well as a list of conflicts and dependencies upon other plugins. There are many methods defined in the MantisPlugin class that may be used as convenient places to define extra behaviors, such as configuration options, event declarations, event hooks, errors, and database schemas. Outside a plugin's core class, there is a standard method of handling language strings, content pages, and files.

At page load, the core MantisBT API will find and process any conforming plugins. Plugins will be checked for minimal information, such as its name, version, and dependencies. Plugins that meet requirements will then be initialized. At this point, MantisBT will interact with the plugins when appropriate.

The plugin system includes a special set of API functions that provide convenience wrappers around the more useful MantisBT API calls, including configuration, language strings, and link generation. This API allows plugins to use core API's in "sandboxed" fashions to aid interoperation with other plugins, and simplification of common functionality.


Building a Plugin

This section will act as a walkthrough of how to build a plugin, from the bare basics all the way up to advanced topics. A general understanding of the concepts covered in the last section is assumed, as well as knowledge of how the event system works. Later topics in this section will require knowledge of database schemas and how they are used with MantisBT.

This walkthrough will be working towards building a single end result: the "Example" plugin as listed in the next section. You may refer to the final source code along the way, although every part of it will be built up in steps throughout this section.


The Basics

This section will introduce the general concepts of plugin structure, and how to get a barebones plugin working with MantisBT. Not much will be mentioned yet on the topic of adding functionality to plugins, just how to get the development process rolling.


Plugin Structure

The backbone of every plugin is what MantisBT calls the "basename", a succinct, and most importantly, unique name that identifies the plugin. It may not contain any spacing or special characters beyond the ASCII upper- and lowercase alphabet, numerals, and underscore. This is used to identify the plugin everywhere except for what the end-user sees. For our "Example" plugin, the basename we will use should be obvious enough: "Example".

Every plugin must be contained in a single directory named to match the plugin's basename, as well as contain at least a single PHP file, also named to match the basename, as such:

Example/
	Example.php
				

This top-level PHP file must then contain a concrete class deriving from the MantisPlugin class, which must be named in the form of %Basename%Plugin, which for our purpose becomes ExamplePlugin.

Because of how MantisPlugin declares the register() method as abstract, our plugin must implement that method before PHP will find it semantically valid. This method is meant for one simple purpose, and should never be used for any other task: setting the plugin's information properties, including the plugin's name, description, version, and more.

Once your plugin defines its class, implements the register() method, and sets at least the name and version properties, it is then considered a "complete" plugin, and can be loaded and installed within MantisBT's plugin manager. At this stage, our Example plugin, with all the possible plugin properties set at registration, looks like this:

Example/Example.php

<?php
class ExamplePlugin extends MantisPlugin {
    function register() {
        $this->name = 'Example';    # Proper name of plugin
        $this->description = '';    # Short description of the plugin
        $this->page = '';           # Default plugin page

        $this->version = '1.0';     # Plugin version string
        $this->requires = array(    # Plugin dependencies, array of basename => version pairs
            'MantisCore' => '1.2.0, <= 1.2.0',  #   Should always depend on an appropriate version of MantisBT
            );

        $this->author = '';         # Author/team name
        $this->contact = '';        # Author/team e-mail address
        $this->url = '';            # Support webpage
    }
}
				

This alone will allow the Example plugin to be installed with MantisBT, and is the foundation of any plugin. More of the plugin development process will be continued in the next sections.


Pages and Files

The plugin API provides a standard hierarchy and process for adding new pages and files to your plugin. For strict definitions, pages are PHP files that will be executed within the MantisBT core system, while files are defined as a separate set of raw data that will be passed to the client's browser exactly as it appears in the filesystem.

New pages for your plugin should be placed in your plugin's pages/ directory, and should be named using only letters and numbers, and must have a ".php" file extension. To generate a URI to the new page in MantisBT, the API function plugin_page() should be used. Our Example plugin will create a page named foo.php, which can then be accessed via plugin_page.php?page=Example/foo, the same URI that plugin_page() would have generated:

Example/pages/foo.php

<?php
echo '<p>Here is a link to <a href="', plugin_page( 'foo' ), '">page foo</a>.</p>';
			

Adding non-PHP files, such as images or CSS stylesheets, follows a very similar pattern as pages. Files should be placed in the plugin's files/ directory, and can only contain a single period in the name. The file's URI is generated with the plugin_file() function. For our Example plugin, we'll create a basic CSS stylesheet, and modify the previously shown page to include the stylesheet:

Example/files/foo.css

p.foo {
    color: red;
}
			
Example/pages/foo.php

<?php
echo '<p>Here is a link to <a href="', plugin_page( 'foo' ), '">page foo</a>.</p>';
echo '<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="', plugin_file( 'foo.css' ), '"/>',
     '<p class="foo">This is red text.</p>';
			

Note that while plugin_page() expects on the page's name, without the extension, plugin_file() requires the entire filename so that it can distinguish between foo.css and a potential file foo.png.

The plugin's filesystem structure at this point looks like this:

Example/
	Example.php
	pages/
		foo.php
	files/
		foo.css
			

Events

Plugins have an integrated method for both declaring and hooking events, without needing to directly call the event API functions. These take the form of class methods on your plugin.

To declare a new event, or a set of events, that your plugin will trigger, override the events() method of your plugin class, and return an associative array with event names as the key, and the event type as the value. Let's add an event "foo" to our Example plugin that does not expect a return value (an "execute" event type), and another event 'bar' that expects a single value that gets modified by each hooked function (a "chain" event type):

Example/Example.php

<?php
class ExamplePlugin extends MantisPlugin {
    ...

    function events() {
        return array(
            'EVENT_EXAMPLE_FOO' => EVENT_TYPE_EXECUTE,
            'EVENT_EXAMPLE_BAR' => EVENT_TYPE_CHAIN,
        );
    }
}
			

When the Example plugin is loaded, the event system in MantisBT will add these two events to its list of events, and will then allow other plugins or functions to hook them. Naming the events "EVENT_PLUGINNAME_EVENTNAME" is not necessary, but is considered best practice to avoid conflicts between plugins.

Hooking other events (or events from your own plugin) is almost identical to declaring them. Instead of passing an event type as the value, your plugin must pass the name of a class method on your plugin that will be called when the event is triggered. For our Example plugin, we'll create a foo() and bar() method on our plugin class, and hook them to the events we declared earlier.

Example/Example.php

<?php
class ExamplePlugin extends MantisPlugin {
    ...

    function hooks() {
        return array(
            'EVENT_EXAMPLE_FOO' => 'foo',
            'EVENT_EXAMPLE_BAR' => 'bar',
        );
    }

    function foo( $p_event ) {
        ...
    }

    function bar( $p_event, $p_chained_param ) {
        ...
        return $p_chained_param;
    }
}
			

Note that both hooked methods need to accept the $p_event parameter, as that contains the event name triggering the method (for cases where you may want a method hooked to multiple events). The bar() method also accepts and returns the chained parameter in order to match the expectations of the "bar" event.

Now that we have our plugin's events declared and hooked, let's modify our earlier page so that triggers the events, and add some real processing to the hooked methods:

Example/Example.php

<?php
class ExamplePlugin extends MantisPlugin {
    ...

    function foo( $p_event ) {
        echo 'In method foo(). ';
    }

    function bar( $p_event, $p_chained_param ) {
        return str_replace( 'foo', 'bar', $p_chained_param );
    }
}
			
Example/pages/foo.php

<?php
echo '<p>Here is a link to <a href="', plugin_page( 'foo' ), '">page foo</a>.</p>';
     '<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="', plugin_file( 'foo.css' ), '"/>',
     '<p class="foo">';

event_signal( 'EVENT_EXAMPLE_FOO' );

$t_string = 'A sentence with the word "foo" in it.';
$t_new_string = event_signal( 'EVENT_EXAMPLE_BAR', array( $t_string ) );

echo $t_new_string, '</p>';
			

When the first event "foo" is signaled, the Example plugin's foo() method will execute and echo a string. After that, the second event "bar" is signaled, and the page passes a string parameter; the plugin's bar() gets the string and replaces any instance of "foo" with "bar", and returns the resulting string. If any other plugin had hooked the event, that plugin could have further modified the new string from the Example plugin, or vice versa, depending on the loading order of plugins. The page then echos the modified string that was returned from the event.


Configuration

Similar to events, plugins have a simplified method for declaring configuration options, as well as API functions for retrieving or setting those values at runtime.

Declaring a new configuration option is achieved just like declaring events. By overriding the config() method on your plugin class, your plugin can return an associative array of configuration options, with the option name as the key, and the default option as the array value. Our Example plugin will declare an option "foo_or_bar", with a default value of "foo":

Example/Example.php

<?php
class ExamplePlugin extends MantisPlugin {
    ...

    function config() {
        return array(
            'foo_or_bar' => 'foo',
        );
    }
}
			

Retrieving the current value of a plugin's configuration option is achieved by using the plugin API's plugin_config_get() function, and can be set to a modified value in the database using plugin_config_set(). With these functions, the config option is prefixed with the plugin's name, in attempt to automatically avoid conflicts in naming. Our Example plugin will demonstrate this by adding a secure form to the "config_page", and handling the form on a separate page "config_update" that will modify the value in the database, and redirect back to page "config_page", just like any other form and action page in MantisBT:

Example/pages/config_page.php

<form action="<?php echo plugin_page( 'config_update' ) ?>" method="post">
<?php echo form_security_field( 'plugin_Example_config_update' ) ?>

<label>Foo or Bar?<br/><input name="foo_or_bar" value="<?php echo string_attribute( $t_foo_or_bar ) ?>"/></label>
<br/>
<label><input type="checkbox" name="reset"/> Reset</label>
<br/>
<input type="submit"/>

</form>
			
Example/pages/config_update.php

<?php
form_security_validate( 'plugin_Example_config_update' );

$f_foo_or_bar = gpc_get_string( 'foo_or_bar' );
$f_reset = gpc_get_bool( 'reset', false );

if ( $f_reset ) {
    plugin_config_delete( 'foo_or_bar' );
} else {
    if ( $f_foo_or_bar == 'foo' || $f_foo_or_bar == 'bar' ) {
        plugin_config_set( 'foo_or_bar', $f_foo_or_bar );
    }
}

form_security_purge( 'plugin_Example_config_update' );
print_successful_redirect( plugin_page( 'foo', true ) );
			

Note that the form_security_*() functions are part of the form API, and prevent CSRF attacks against forms that make changes to the system.


Language and Localization

MantisBT has a very advanced set of localization tools, which allow all parts of of the application to be localized to the user's preferred language. This feature has been extended for use by plugins as well, so that a plugin can be localized in much the same method as used for the core system. Localizing a plugin involves creating a language file for each localization available, and using a special API call to retrieve the appropriate string for the user's language.

All language files for plugins follow the same format used in the core of MantisBT, should be placed in the plugin's lang/ directory, and named the same as the core language files. Strings specific to the plugin should be "namespaced" in a way that will minimize any risk of collision. Translating the plugin to other languages already supported by MantisBT is then as simple as creating a new strings file with the localized content; the MantisBT core will find and use the new language strings automatically.

We'll use the "configuration" pages from the previous examples, and dress them up with localized language strings, and add a few more flourishes to make the page act like a standard MantisBT page. First we need to create a language file for English, the default language of MantisBT and the default fallback language in the case that some strings have not yet been localized to the user's language:

Example/lang/strings_english.txt

<?php

$s_plugin_Example_configuration = "Configuration";
$s_plugin_Example_foo_or_bar = "Foo or Bar?";
$s_plugin_Example_reset = "Reset Value";
			
Example/pages/config_page.php
<?php

html_page_top( plugin_lang_get( 'configuration' ) );
$t_foo_or_bar = plugin_config_get( 'foo_or_bar' );

?>

<br/>

<form action="<?php echo plugin_page( 'config_update' ) ?>" method="post">
<?php echo form_security_field( 'plugin_Example_config_update' ) ?>
<table class="width60" align="center">

<tr>
    <td class="form-title" rowspan="2"><?php echo plugin_lang_get( 'configuration' ) ?></td>
</tr>

<tr <?php echo helper_alternate_class() ?>>
    <td class="category"><php echo plugin_lang_get( 'foo_or_bar' ) ?></td>
    <td><input name="foo_or_bar" value="<?php echo string_attribute( $t_foo_or_bar ) ?>"/></td>
</tr>

<tr <?php echo helper_alternate_class() ?>>
    <td class="category"><php echo plugin_lang_get( 'reset' ) ?></td>
    <td><input type="checkbox" name="reset"/></td>
</tr>

<tr>
    <td class="center" rowspan="2"><input type="submit"/></td>
</tr>

</table>
</form>

<?php

html_page_bottom();
			

The two calls to html_page_top() and html_page_bottom() trigger the standard MantisBT header and footer portions, respectively, which also displays things such as the menus and triggers other layout-related events. helper_alternate_class() generates the CSS classes for alternating row colors in the table. The rest of the HTML and CSS follows the "standard" MantisBT markup styles for content and layout.


Example Plugin Source Listing

The code in this section, for the Example plugin, is available for use, modification, and redistribution without any restrictions and without any warranty or implied warranties. You may use this code however you want.

Example/
    Example.php
    files/
        foo.css
    lang/
        strings_english.txt
    pages/
        config_page.php
        config_update.php
        foo.php
	

Example/Example.php

Example/Example.php
<?php
class ExamplePlugin extends MantisPlugin {
    function register() {
        $this->name = 'Example';    # Proper name of plugin
        $this->description = '';    # Short description of the plugin
        $this->page = '';           # Default plugin page

        $this->version = '1.0';     # Plugin version string
        $this->requires = array(    # Plugin dependencies, array of basename => version pairs
            'MantisCore' => '1.2.0, <= 1.2.0',  #   Should always depend on an appropriate version of MantisBT
            );

        $this->author = '';         # Author/team name
        $this->contact = '';        # Author/team e-mail address
        $this->url = '';            # Support webpage
    }

    function events() {
        return array(
            'EVENT_EXAMPLE_FOO' => EVENT_TYPE_EXECUTE,
            'EVENT_EXAMPLE_BAR' => EVENT_TYPE_CHAIN,
        );
    }

    function hooks() {
        return array(
            'EVENT_EXAMPLE_FOO' => 'foo',
            'EVENT_EXAMPLE_BAR' => 'bar',
        );
    }

    function config() {
        return array(
            'foo_or_bar' => 'foo',
        );
    }

    function foo( $p_event ) {
        echo 'In method foo(). ';
    }

    function bar( $p_event, $p_chained_param ) {
        return str_replace( 'foo', 'bar', $p_chained_param );
    }

}
		

Example/files/foo.css

Example/files/foo.css
p.foo {
    color: red;
}
		

Example/lang/strings_english.txt

Example/lang/strings_english.txt
<?php

$s_plugin_Example_configuration = "Configuration";
$s_plugin_Example_foo_or_bar = "Foo or Bar?";
$s_plugin_Example_reset = "Reset Value";
		

Example/page/config_page.php

Example/pages/config_page.php
<?php

html_page_top( plugin_lang_get( 'configuration' ) );
$t_foo_or_bar = plugin_config_get( 'foo_or_bar' );

?>

<br/>

<form action="<?php echo plugin_page( 'config_update' ) ?>" method="post">
<?php echo form_security_field( 'plugin_Example_config_update' ) ?>
<table class="width60" align="center">

<tr>
    <td class="form-title" rowspan="2"><?php echo plugin_lang_get( 'configuration' ) ?></td>
</tr>

<tr <?php echo helper_alternate_class() ?>>
    <td class="category"><php echo plugin_lang_get( 'foo_or_bar' ) ?></td>
    <td><input name="foo_or_bar" value="<?php echo string_attribute( $t_foo_or_bar ) ?>"/></td>
</tr>

<tr <?php echo helper_alternate_class() ?>>
    <td class="category"><php echo plugin_lang_get( 'reset' ) ?></td>
    <td><input type="checkbox" name="reset"/></td>
</tr>

<tr>
    <td class="center" rowspan="2"><input type="submit"/></td>
</tr>

</table>
</form>

<?php

html_page_bottom();
		

Example/pages/config_update.php

Example/pages/config_update.php
<?php
form_security_validate( 'plugin_Example_config_update' );

$f_foo_or_bar = gpc_get_string( 'foo_or_bar' );
$f_reset = gpc_get_bool( 'reset', false );

if ( $f_reset ) {
    plugin_config_delete( 'foo_or_bar' );
} else {
    if ( $f_foo_or_bar == 'foo' || $f_foo_or_bar == 'bar' ) {
        plugin_config_set( 'foo_or_bar', $f_foo_or_bar );
    }
}

form_security_purge( 'plugin_Example_config_update' );
print_successful_redirect( plugin_page( 'foo', true ) );
		

Example/page/foo.php

Example/pages/foo.php
<?php
echo '<p>Here is a link to <a href="', plugin_page( 'foo' ), '">page foo</a>.</p>';
     '<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="', plugin_file( 'foo.css' ), '"/>',
     '<p class="foo">';

event_signal( 'EVENT_EXAMPLE_FOO' );

$t_string = 'A sentence with the word "foo" in it.';
$t_new_string = event_signal( 'EVENT_EXAMPLE_BAR', array( $t_string ) );

echo $t_new_string, '</p>';
		

API Usage

This is a general overview of the plugin API. For more detailed analysis, you may reference the file core/plugin_api.php in the codebase.


Event Reference

Introduction

In this chapter, an attempt will be made to list all events used (or planned for later use) in the MantisBT event system. Each listed event will include details for the event type, when the event is called, and the expected parameters and return values for event callbacks.

Here we show an example event definition. For each event, the event identifier will be listed along with the event type in parentheses. Below that should be a concise but thorough description of how the event is called and how to use it. Following that should be a list of event parameters (if any), as well as the expected return value (if any).

EVENT_EXAMPLE (Default)

This is an example event description.

Parameters

  • <Type>: Description of parameter one

  • <Type>: Description of parameter two

Return Value

  • <Type>: Description of return value


System Events

These events are initiated by the plugin system itself to allow certain functionality to simplify plugin development.

EVENT_PLUGIN_INIT (Execute)

This event is triggered by the MantisBT plugin system after all registered and enabled plugins have been initialized (their init() functions have been called). This event should always be the first event triggered for any page load. No parameters are passed to hooked functions, and no return values are expected.

This event is the first point in page execution where all registered plugins are guaranteed to be enabled (assuming dependencies and such are met). At any point before this event, any or all plugins may not yet be loaded. Note that the core system has not yet completed the bootstrap process when this event is signalled.

Suggested uses for the event include:

  • Checking for plugins that aren't require for normal usage.

  • Interacting with other plugins outside the context of pages or events.

EVENT_CORE_READY (Execute)

This event is triggered by the MantisBT bootstrap process after all core APIs have been initialized, including the plugin system, but before control is relinquished from the bootstrap process back to the originating page. No parameters are passed to hooked functions, and no return values are expected.

This event is the first point in page execution where the entire system is considered loaded and ready.

EVENT_LOG (Execute)

This event is triggered by MantisBT to log a message. The contents of the message should be hyper linked based on the following rules: #123 means issue 123, ~123 means issue note 123, @P123 means project 123, @U123 means user 123. Logging plugins can capture extra context information like timestamp, current logged in user, etc. This event receives the logging string as a parameter.


Output Modifier Events

String Display

These events make it possible to dynamically modify output strings to interpret or add semantic meaning or markup. Examples include the creation of links to other bugs or bugnotes, as well as handling urls to other sites in general.

EVENT_DISPLAY_BUG_ID (Chained)

This is an event to format bug ID numbers before being displayed, using the bug_format_id() API call. The result should be plain-text, as the resulting string is used in various formats and locations.

Parameters

  • String: bug ID string to be displayed

  • Int: bug ID number

Return Value

  • String: modified bug ID string

EVENT_DISPLAY_EMAIL (Chained)

This is an event to format text before being sent in an email. Callbacks should be used to process text and convert it into a plaintext-readable format so that users with textual email clients can best utilize the information. Hyperlinks and other markup should be removed, leaving the core content by itself.

Parameters

  • String: input string to be displayed

Return Value

  • String: modified input string

EVENT_DISPLAY_FORMATTED (Chained)

This is an event to display generic formatted text. The string to be displayed is passed between hooked callbacks, each taking a turn to modify the output in some specific manner. Text passed to this may be processed for all types of formatting and markup, including clickable links, presentation adjustments, etc.

Parameters

  • String: input string to be displayed

Return Value

  • String: modified input string

EVENT_DISPLAY_RSS (Chained)

This is an event to format content before being displayed in an RSS feed. Text should be processed to perform any necessary character escaping to preserve hyperlinks and other appropriate markup.

Parameters

  • String: input string to be displayed

  • Boolean: multiline input string

Return Value

  • String: modified input string

EVENT_DISPLAY_TEXT (Chained)

This is an event to display generic unformatted text. The string to be displayed is passed between hooked callbacks, each taking a turn to modify the output in some specific manner. Text passed to this event should only be processed for the most basic formatting, such as preserving line breaks and special characters.

Parameters

  • String: input string to be displayed

  • Boolean: multiline input string

Return Value

  • String: modified input string


Menu Items

These events allow new menu items to be inserted in order for new content to be added, such as new pages or integration with other applications.

EVENT_MENU_ACCOUNT (Default)

This event gives plugins the opportunity to add new links to the user account menu available to users from the 'My Account' link on the main menu.

Return Value

  • Array: List of HTML links for the user account menu.

EVENT_MENU_DOCS (Default)

This event gives plugins the opportunity to add new links to the documents menu available to users from the 'Docs' link on the main menu.

Return Value

  • Array: List of HTML links for the documents menu.

EVENT_MENU_FILTER (Default)

This event gives plugins the opportunity to add new links to the issue list menu available to users from the 'View Issues' link on the main menu.

Return Value

  • Array: List of HTML links for the issue list menu.

EVENT_MENU_ISSUE (Default)

This event gives plugins the opportunity to add new links to the issue menu available to users when viewing issues.

Return Value

  • Array: List of HTML links for the documents menu.

EVENT_MENU_MAIN (Default)

This event gives plugins the opportunity to add new links to the main menu at the top (or bottom) of every page in MantisBT. New links will be added after the 'Docs' link, and before the 'Manage' link. Hooked events may return multiple links, in which case each link in the array will be automatically separated with the '|' symbol as usual.

Return Value

  • Array: List of HTML links for the main menu.

EVENT_MENU_MAIN_FRONT (Default)

This event gives plugins the opportunity to add new links to the main menu at the top (or bottom) of every page in MantisBT. New links will be added after the 'Main' link, and before the 'My View' link. Hooked events may return multiple links, in which case each link in the array will be automatically separated with the '|' symbol as usual.

Return Value

  • Array: List of HTML links for the main menu.

EVENT_MENU_MANAGE (Default)

This event gives plugins the opportunity to add new links to the management menu available to site administrators from the 'Manage' link on the main menu. Plugins should try to minimize use of these links to functions dealing with core MantisBT management.

Return Value

  • Array: List of HTML links for the management menu.

EVENT_MENU_MANAGE_CONFIG (Default)

This event gives plugins the opportunity to add new links to the configuration management menu available to site administrators from the 'Manage Configuration' link on the standard management menu. Plugins should try to minimize use of these links to functions dealing with core MantisBT configuration.

Return Value

  • Array: List of HTML links for the manage configuration menu.

EVENT_MENU_SUMMARY (Default)

This event gives plugins the opportunity to add new links to the summary menu available to users from the 'Summary' link on the main menu.

Return Value

  • Array: List of HTML links for the summary menu.


Page Layout

These events offer the chance to create output at points relevant to the overall page layout of MantisBT. Page headers, footers, stylesheets, and more can be created. Events listed below are in order of runtime execution.

EVENT_LAYOUT_RESOURCES (Output)

This event allows plugins to output HTML code from inside the <head> tag, for use with CSS, Javascript, RSS, or any other similary resources. Note that this event is signaled after all other CSS and Javascript resources are linked by MantisBT.

Return Value

  • String: HTML code to output.

EVENT_LAYOUT_BODY_BEGIN (Output)

This event allows plugins to output HTML code immediatly after the <body> tag is opened, so that MantisBT may be integrated within another website's template, or other similar use.

Return Value

  • String: HTML code to output.

EVENT_LAYOUT_PAGE_HEADER (Output)

This event allows plugins to output HTML code immediatly after the MantisBT header content, such as the logo image.

Return Value

  • String: HTML code to output.

EVENT_LAYOUT_CONTENT_BEGIN (Output)

This event allows plugins to output HTML code after the top main menu, but before any page-specific content begins.

Return Value

  • String: HTML code to output.

EVENT_LAYOUT_CONTENT_END (Output)

This event allows plugins to output HTML code after any page- specific content has completed, but before the bottom menu bar (or footer).

Return Value

  • String: HTML code to output.

EVENT_LAYOUT_PAGE_FOOTER (Output)

This event allows plugins to output HTML code after the MantisBT version, copyright, and webmaster information, but before the query information.

Return Value

  • String: HTML code to output.

EVENT_LAYOUT_BODY_END (Output)

This event allows plugins to output HTML code immediatly before the </body> end tag, to so that MantisBT may be integrated within another website's template, or other similar use.

Return Value

  • String: HTML code to output.


Bug Filter Events

Custom Filters and Columns

EVENT_FILTER_FIELDS (Default)

This event allows a plugin to register custom filter objects (based on the MantisFilter class) that will allow the user to search for issues based on custom criteria or datasets. The plugin must ensure that the filter class has been defined before returning the class name for this event.

Return Value

  • <Array>: Array of class names for custom filters

EVENT_FILTER_COLUMNS (Default)

This event allows a plugin to register custom column objects (based on the MantisColumn class) that will allow the user to view data for issues based on custom datasets. The plugin must ensure that the column class has been defined before returning the class name for this event.

Return Value

  • <Array>: Array of class names for custom columns


Bug and Bugnote Events

Bug View

EVENT_VIEW_BUG_DETAILS (Execute)

This event allows a plugin to either process information or display some data in the bug view page. It is triggered after the row containing the target version and product build fields, and before the bug summary is displayed.

Any output here should be defining appropriate rows and columns for the surrounding

<table>
elements.

Parameters

  • <Integer>: Bug ID

EVENT_VIEW_BUG_EXTRA (Execute)

This event allows a plugin to either process information or display some data in the bug view page. It is triggered after the bug notes have been displayed, but before the history log is shown.

Any output here should be contained within its own

<table>
element.

Parameters

  • <Integer>: Bug ID


Bug Actions

EVENT_REPORT_BUG_FORM (Execute)

This event allows plugins to do processing or display form elements on the Report Issue page. It is triggered immediately before the summary text field.

Any output here should be defining appropriate rows and columns for the surrounding <table> elements.

Parameters

  • <Integer>: Project ID

EVENT_REPORT_BUG_FORM_TOP (Execute)

This event allows plugins to do processing or display form elements at the top of the Report Issue page. It is triggered before any of the visible form elements have been created.

Any output here should be defining appropriate rows and columns for the surrounding <table> elements.

Parameters

  • <Integer>: Project ID

EVENT_REPORT_BUG_DATA (Chain)

This event allows plugins to perform pre-processing of the new bug data structure after being reported from the user, but before the data is saved to the database. At this point, the issue ID is not yet known, as the data has not yet been persisted.

Parameters

  • <Complex>: Bug data structure (see core/bug_api.php)

Return Value

  • <Complex>: Bug data structure

EVENT_REPORT_BUG (Execute)

This event allows plugins to perform post-processing of the bug data structure after being reported from the user and being saved to the database. At this point, the issue ID is actually known, and is passed as a second parameter.

Parameters

  • <Complex>: Bug data structure (see core/bug_api.php)

  • <Integer>: Bug ID

EVENT_UPDATE_BUG_FORM (Execute)

This event allows plugins to do processing or display form elements on the Update Issue page. It is triggered immediately before the summary text field.

Parameters

  • <Integer>: Bug ID

EVENT_UPDATE_BUG_FORM_TOP (Execute)

This event allows plugins to do processing or display form elements on the Update Issue page. It is triggered immediately before before any of the visible form elements have been created.

Parameters

  • <Integer>: Bug ID

EVENT_UPDATE_BUG (Chain)

This event allows plugins to perform both pre- and post-processing of the updated bug data structure after being modified by the user, but before being saved to the database.

Parameters

  • <Complex>: Bug data structure (see core/bug_api.php)

  • <Integer>: Bug ID

Return Value

  • <Complex>: Bug data structure

EVENT_UPDATE_BUG_STATUS_FORM (Execute)

This event allows plugins to do processing or display form elements in the bug change status form. It is triggered immediately before the add bugnote fields.

Any output here should be defining appropriate rows and columns for the surrounding <table> elements.

Parameters

  • <Integer>: Bug ID

EVENT_BUG_ACTION (Execute)

This event allows plugins to perform post-processing of group actions performed from the View Issues page. The event will get called for each bug ID that was part of the group action event.

Parameters

  • <String>: Action title (see bug_actiongroup.php)

  • <Integer>: Bug ID

EVENT_BUG_DELETED (Execute)

This event allows plugins to perform pre-processing of bug deletion actions. The actual deletion will occur after execution of the event, for compatibility reasons.

Parameters

  • <Integer>: Bug ID


Bugnote View

EVENT_VIEW_BUGNOTES_START (Execute)

This event allows a plugin to either process information or display some data in the bug notes section, before any bug notes are displayed. It is triggered after the bug notes section title.

Any output here should be defining appropriate rows and columns for the surrounding <table> elements.

Parameters

  • <Integer>: Bug ID

  • <Complex>: A list of all bugnotes to be displayed to the user

EVENT_VIEW_BUGNOTE (Execute)

This event allows a plugin to either process information or display some data in the bug notes section, interleaved with the individual bug notes. It gets triggered after every bug note is displayed.

Any output here should be defining appropriate rows and columns for the surrounding <table> elements.

Parameters

  • <Integer>: Bug ID

  • <Integer>: Bugnote ID

  • <Boolean>: Private bugnote (false if public)

EVENT_VIEW_BUGNOTES_END (Execute)

This event allows a plugin to either process information or display some data in the bug notes section, after all bugnotes have been displayed.

Any output here should be defining appropriate rows and columns for the surrounding <table> elements.

Parameters

  • <Integer>: Bug ID


Bugnote Actions

EVENT_BUGNOTE_ADD_FORM (Execute)

This event allows plugins to do processing or display form elements in the bugnote adding form. It is triggered immediately after the bugnote text field.

Any output here should be defining appropriate rows and columns for the surrounding <table> elements.

Parameters

  • <Integer>: Bug ID

EVENT_BUGNOTE_ADD (Execute)

This event allows plugins to do post-processing of bugnotes added to an issue.

Parameters

  • <Integer>: Bug ID

  • <Integer>: Bugnote ID

EVENT_BUGNOTE_EDIT_FORM (Execute)

This event allows plugins to do processing or display form elements in the bugnote editing form. It is triggered immediately after the bugnote text field.

Any output here should be defining appropriate rows and columns for the surrounding <table> elements.

Parameters

  • <Integer>: Bug ID

  • <Integer>: Bugnote ID

EVENT_BUGNOTE_EDIT (Execute)

This event allows plugins to do post-processing of bugnote edits.

Parameters

  • <Integer>: Bug ID

  • <Integer>: Bugnote ID

EVENT_BUGNOTE_DELETED (Execute)

This event allows plugins to do post-processing of bugnote deletions.

Parameters

  • <Integer>: Bug ID

  • <Integer>: Bugnote ID

EVENT_TAG_ATTACHED (Execute)

This event allows plugins to do post-processing of attached tags.

Parameters

  • <Integer>: Bug ID

  • <Array of Integers>: Tag IDs

EVENT_TAG_DETACHED (Execute)

This event allows plugins to do post-processing of detached tags.

Parameters

  • <Integer>: Bug ID

  • <Array of Integers>: Tag IDs


Notification Events

Recipient Selection

EVENT_NOTIFY_USER_INCLUDE (Default)

This event allows a plugin to specify a set of users to be included as recipients for a notification. The set of users returned is added to the list of recipients already generated from the existing notification flags and selection process.

Parameters

  • <Integer>: Bug ID

  • <String>: Notification type

Return Value

  • <Array>: User IDs to include as recipients

EVENT_NOTIFY_USER_EXCLUDE (Default)

This event allows a plugin to selectively exclude indivdual users from the recipient list for a notification. The event is signalled for every user in the final reicipient list, including recipients added by the event NOTIFY_USER_INCLUDE as described above.

Parameters

  • <Integer>: Bug ID

  • <String>: Notification type

  • <Integer>: User ID

Return Value

  • <Boolean>: True to exclude the user, false otherwise


User Account Events

Account Preferences

EVENT_ACCOUNT_PREFS_UPDATE_FORM (Execute)

This event allows plugins to do processing or display form elements on the Account Preferences page. It is triggered immediately after the last core preference element.

Any output here should be defining appropriate rows and columns for the surrounding <table> elements.

Parameters

  • <Integer>: User ID

EVENT_ACCOUNT_PREFS_UPDATE (Execute)

This event allows plugins to do pre-processing of form elements from the Account Preferences page. It is triggered immediately before the user preferences are saved to the database.

Parameters

  • <Integer>: User ID


Management Events

EVENT_MANAGE_OVERVIEW_INFO (Output)

This event allows plugins to display special information on the Management Overview page.

Any output here should be defining appropriate rows and columns for the surrounding <table> elements.


Projects and Versions

EVENT_MANAGE_PROJECT_PAGE (Execute)

This event allows plugins to do processing or display information on the View Project page. It is triggered immediately before the project access blocks.

Any output here should be contained within its own <table> element.

Parameters

  • <Integer>: Project ID

EVENT_MANAGE_PROJECT_CREATE_FORM (Execute)

This event allows plugins to do processing or display form elements on the Create Project page. It is triggered immediately before the submit button.

Any output here should be defining appropriate rows and columns for the surrounding <table> elements.

EVENT_MANAGE_PROJECT_CREATE (Execute)

This event allows plugins to do post-processing of newly-created projects and form elements from the Create Project page.

Parameters

  • <Integer>: Project ID

EVENT_MANAGE_PROJECT_UPDATE_FORM (Execute)

This event allows plugins to do processing or display form elements in the Edit Project form on the View Project page. It is triggered immediately before the submit button.

Any output here should be defining appropriate rows and columns for the surrounding <table> elements.

Parameters

  • <Integer>: Project ID

EVENT_MANAGE_PROJECT_UPDATE (Execute)

This event allows plugins to do post-processing of modified projects and form elements from the Edit Project form.

Parameters

  • <Integer>: Project ID

EVENT_MANAGE_VERSION_CREATE (Execute)

This event allows plugins to do post-processing of newly-created project versions from the View Project page, or versions copied from other projects. This event is triggered for each version created.

Parameters

  • <Integer>: Version ID

EVENT_MANAGE_VERSION_UPDATE_FORM (Execute)

This event allows plugins to do processing or display form elements on the Update Version page. It is triggered immediately before the submit button.

Any output here should be defining appropriate rows and columns for the surrounding <table> elements.

Parameters

  • <Integer>: Version ID

EVENT_MANAGE_VERSION_UPDATE (Execute)

This event allows plugins to do post-processing of modified versions and form elements from the Edit Version page.

Parameters

  • <Integer>: Version ID


Integrating with MantisBT

The primary means of integrating with MantisBT is with the SOAP API , bundled with MantisBT. The SOAP API is accessible at http://server.com/mantis/api/soap/mantisconnect.php.


Java integration

Prebuilt SOAP stubs using Axis

For ease of integration of the Java clients, SOAP stubs are maintained and deployed in the Maven central repository. To include them in your project, use the following coordinates:

	<dependency>
	    <groupId>biz.futureware.mantis</groupId>
	    <artifactId>mantis-axis-soap-client</artifactId>
	    <version>1.2.6</version>
	</dependency>
			

Alternatively, download the latest available version from http://search.maven.org/#search|gav|1|g%3A%22biz.futureware.mantis%22%20AND%20a%3A%22mantis-axis-soap-client%22.


Usage in OSGi environments

If you would like to use Axis in an OSGi environment, it is recommended that you use a ready-made bundle, such as the Axis bundle available from Eclipse Orbit


Compatibility between releases

The SOAP API signature will change between minor releases, typically to add new functionality or to extend existing features.

Some of these changes might require a refresh of the client libraries generated, for instance Apache Axis 1 SOAP stubs must be regenerated if a complex type receives a new property. Such changes will be announced before the release of the new MantisBT version on the mantisbt-soap-dev mailing list . Typically there will be two weeks time to integrate the new SOAP stubs.


Support

The primary means of obtaining support is through the mantisbt-soap-dev mailing list.


Appendix